Satterly References

Compilation of research on the history and meaning of the surnames Satterly, Satterley, Satterlee, and other spellings. Includes meaning of the place names Satterleigh, Devon, England, and Sotterley, Suffolk, England.

Updated March 9, 2022
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Introduction

These references cover the origins and meaning of Satterly and all the variant spellings and the place names Satterleigh, Devon, England, and Sotterley, Suffolk, England, and their root words. It serves as the foundation to the other pages about Satterly.

To save space when printing these books used abbreviations extensively. I expanded these abbreviations according to the books' abbreviation lists. This should save everyone quite a bit of effort deciphering quotes full of abbreviations.

I tried to preserve as much of the original formatting as possible, but some of it was lost when I copied it here. I left the original formatting alone even when it was obviously attempting to imitate something not available such as using underlining on a typewriter to imitate italics.

I changed and fixed some of the spelling. Most of the changes were converting British to American spelling and archaic or rare usage to modern usage. I capitalized the first letter of all place names. Some books used small caps instead of capitals.

Most of these books simply copied from each another while adding errors along the way. When the authors did copy something few bothered to cite the source. If you read this page you will need to read all of it to understand.

Books

Aiden, The Apostle of the North

Sætere, ² the “place or disposer,” gives his name to Sæteres-dæg, the seventh day of the week.

² Some derive Satterthwaite (Camb.) = “Sætere's Clearing,” and Satterleigh in Devonshire, from the name of this god. Edmund's page 278 ; Kemble [, The Saxons in England], i. [page] 372. (ref)

American Ancestry

… son of Rev. William Satterley vicar of St. Ide, near Exeter, England, M. A. of Pembroke College, Oxford, was arrested by Cromwell and imprisoned until the restoration, for fealty to church and king. In addition to his son Benedict he had Rev. William Satterley of the Church of England, who remained in the old country. The Satterlees claim descent from Edmund de Satterley, Suffolk, 1235, and Sir Roger de Satterley, lord of the Manor of Satterley, Suffolk, 1307. The estate was confiscated by Edward IV, bestowed on his adherent, Sir Thomas [Playter], the Yorkist, and purchased by the family of the present owner in 1744, and the old feudal hall replaced by a more modern structure, but the old church, with its marbles and brasses, and the same chancel and fine old screen (bearing the Satterley escutcheon over the central arch) which were set up more than five hundred years ago, still remain in excellent preservation. (ref)

American Surnames

A later book by the same author is titled New Dictionary of American Family Names.

Devonshire: … Satterlee from Satterleigh “robber's wood,” (ref)

Anglo-Saxon Literature

Of the old heathen theogony we have a remarkable document in the names of the days of the week ; and these names are best preserved to us in the rubrics of the Anglo-Saxon Gospels. These names are supposed to have come from the western shores of Asia, and to have pervaded the nations of Europe, both Roman and barbarian, in the first and second centuries. By a comparison of the sets of names in the two families of nations, we gain certain leading facts about the chief deities of our heathen ancestry, which all the rest of the scattered evidence tends to confirm. … Saturday, Anglo-Saxon Satærnes-dæg, seems like a borrowed name from the Latin Saturnus.

Kemble maintained the probability that Sætere was a native divinity, and considered that the local names of Satterthwaite (Lancashire), and Satterleigh (Devon), offered some probably evidence in that direction. (ref)

BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names

Satterleigh Devon, 'sætərlī, sáttĕrli (ref)

Biographical and Historical Sketches of the Sheafe Wentworth Fischer Bache Satterthwaite and Rutgers Families of America

There are several Thwaites in England, and a Satterleigh, indicating that Satter is part of a compound word; and also a Satterness near Kirkcudbright in Scotland. Ness is Icelandic or Norse for promontory. There is also a Saterland in Germany (in Oldenburg), near the coast. Satter (saetr, Norse) originally meant an upper pasture or dairy farm, but came to mean a chalet, … (ref)

British Family Names: Their Origin and Meaning

Satterleigh. A local name, Devon

Sattley. See Satterleigh (ref)

The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names

SATTERLEIGH Devon SS 6622. Possibly 'wood or clearing of the robbers'. Saterleia 1086–1372 with variants -leye- -legh(e). Old English sǣtere 'robber' < Old English sǣtian 'ambush', genitive pl. sǣtera, + lēah. J. E. B. Gover, A. Mawer and F. M. Stenton, The Place-Names of Devon, 2 volumes, Cambridge 1931 page 349, A. H. Smith, English Place-Names Elements, 2 volumes, Cambridge 1956 volume ii page 95.

SOTTERLEY Suffolk TM 4584. Partly unexplained. Soterlega 1086, Soterle -ley(e) 1188–1524, Saterley 1610. Unknown element or personal name + Old English lēah. Eilert Ekwall, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names, 4th edition, Oxford 1960 compares Sotterum, Frisia, Sotrenheim 10th, Hans Bahlow, Deutschlands geographische Namenwelt, Frankfurt am Main 1985 page 455 Sottrum, Wümme-Moor, and Sottrum by Hölle, Hildesheim, all boggy places. M. Cynthia Baron, 'A Study of the Place-Names of East Suffolk', unpublished MA thesis, Sheffield University, 1952. (ref)

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names

Old English lēah masc. (dat. lēa, lēage and lēah fem. (dat. lēa, lēage, līeg) is a very common place name el. It corresponds to Old High German lōh 'grove', LG lōh 'thin wood', Du -loo (in Waterloo &c.) Old Norse 'low-lying meadow' and Latin lūcus 'grove'. The original meaning was 'an open place in a wood, a part in a wood with the trees scattered so that grass can grow'. In English place names two senses are to be reckoned with. The more common one is 'open place in a wood, glade', probably not really a cleared place, but a naturally open space. If the rendering 'clearing' is used, it should be taken in the sense 'glade'. This sense 'open land' is obvious in names such as Bentley, Farsley. It appears specialized to 'meadow, pasture-land' in names like Calverley, Lambley, Studley. A meaning 'open land used as arable' is obvious in Rayleigh, Wheatley, Linley, Flaxley and the like. The great forest of Weald in Kent and Sussex is called Andredesleage 477 The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Wulleleah leag Cartularium saxonicum (ed. Birch. London, 1885-93.) 357 is Wyre forest. The meaning 'wood' is probable in names such as Ashley, Haseley, Oakley or Catley, Rockley, Yaxley (with an animal's name as first el.), or Stockleigh, Staveley, Yardley (where the first el. denotes a product from a wood). Cf. also Baddesley, which appears to be an old name of the New Forest. Lēah is common in names denoting places for heathen worship, as Thundersley. See wēoh. The meaning may here be 'grove' or 'glade'. Names in -lēah are naturally most common in old woodland districts. As the exact meaning of lēah is generally doubtful in place names, it is mostly left untranslated in etymologies.

… It is extremely common as the second el., where it generally appears as -ley (Bradley &c.)

Satterleigh Devonshire [Saterlei Domesday Book, -leye 1277 Feet of Fines]. Has been explained as 'the lēah of the robbers', the first el. being Old English sætere 'robber' (Gover, J. E. B., Mawer, A., and Stenton, F. M. The Place-names of Devon. Cambridge, 1931–2).

Sotterley Suffolk [Soterlega Domesday Book, Soterle 1188 Feet of Fines. Pipe Rolls, 1242 The Book of Fees]. See lēah. The first el. is obscure. Possible it may be that of Sotterum in Frisia [Sotrenheim 10]. (ref)

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain

Satherley

1881: 34; Somerset. English: see Satterley.

Satterley

1881: 109; Devon. English: locative name from Satterleigh (Devon) or Sotterley (Suffolk), which is recorded as Saterley in 1610. It is claimed that the modern Devon surname (not the place-name) arose by migration from Suffolk.

Satterly

1881: 85; Devon. English: see Satterley.

Saturley

1881: 85; Somerset. English: see Satterley. (ref)

Conversion of the West: The English

… with Sætere,⁵ the “Placer or Disposer,” whence comes the name of the seventh week-day.

⁵ Hence some would derive Satterthwaite (Cumberland) = “Sætere's clearing,” and Satterleigh, in Devonshire.–Edmunds, page 278; Kemble [, The Saxons in England], i. [page] 372. (ref)

County of Suffolk: Its History as Disclosed by Existing Records and Other Documents, being Materials for the History of Suffolk

Soterle al. Soterlee al. Soterlega al. Soterley see. Sotterley.

Sotterley (Salteslee, Satterley, Schottele, Sciuterleigh, Soterle, Soterlee, Soterlega, Soterley, Soterleye, Sotirlee, Sot'le, Sotterly). (ref)

A Dictionary of British Place Name

An earlier book A Dictionary of English Place-Names by the same author has the same information.

The numerous British place-names containing woodland terms provide good evidence for the distribution, use and management of woods, copses and groves in early times. Those containing words for types of woodland clearing indicate areas of former forest and the particular purposes for which clearings were used. Names derived from elements denoting various kinds of field, pasture, meadow, arable and enclosure suggest different aspects of land-use in the subsistence agriculture of our ancestors, in which arable and had to be broken in to produce crops, meadowland provided hay, and pastureland and enclosures were needed for animals.

This part is information from the paper The Place-Name Satterleigh.

Satterleigh Devon. Saterlei 1086 (Domesday). Old English lēah 'woodland clearing' with either Old English sǣtere 'robber' or the Old English antecedent of Middle English plant-name seter- 'hellebore'.

Sotterley Suffolk. Soterlega 1086 (Domesday). OE lēah 'woodland clearing' with an uncertain first element, possibly a persons name. (ref)

A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames with Special American Instances

Satterlee, Satterley, Satterly, Saturley.–Local, 'of Satterley' or Satterleigh, a parish in county Devon, near South Molton.
London, 0, 0, 0, 1; New York, 16, 1, 4, 0.

Saturley; see Satterlee.

Sutterle, Sutterley, Suttley.–Local, possibly sometimes a variant 'of Southery' (see Suthery), of which the following seems to be an intermediate form :

Roger de Soterle, county Suffolk, 20 Edward I. Placita de Quo Warranto, temp. Edw. I-III.

This closely resembles the American form Sutterle; but more probably Sutterley is a distinct name from Suthery, the one being the Southerley, the other the Souther-hey (see Lee and Hey).

London (Suttley), 1 ; Philadelphia, 3, 3, 0. (ref)

A Dictionary of English Place-Names

A later book A Dictionary of British Place Name by the same author has the same information.

Satterleigh Devon. Saterlei 1086 (Domesday Book). 'Woodland clearing of the robbers'. Old English sætere + lēah.

Sotterley Suffolk. Soterlega 1086 (Domesday Book). lēah 'woodland clearing' with an uncertain first element, possibly a persons name. (ref)

A Dictionary of English Surnames

A Dictionary of English Surnames was first published as A Dictionary of British Surnames in 1958.

Satterley, Satterly

:Edmund de Saterleye 1242 Fees (Suffolk); Andrew Satterley, William Satterly, Satterleigh 1642 Protestation Returns for Devon. From Satterleigh (Devonshire). (ref)

Saturley

: see SATTERLEY

Encyclopedia of American Family Names

The book puts several other surnames together that are unrelated even though it says each has a different origin and meaning for the first half of the word.

SATTERFIELD, SATTERLEY, SATTERTHWAITE, SATTERWHITE (S.S. Abbreviation: Satter)

Ranking: 1166 S.S. Count: 37,351

Origin: English. … Satterley: the name means robber's clearing and was given to those from Satterleigh, a place in Devonshire, England

Genealogies: Satterlee–ley–ly & Allied Families was compiled by Goldie Satterlee Moffatt and published in Perris, California, in 1970. (ref)

Encyclopedia of Biography of New York

The family [Satterlee] is claimed to have descended from Edmund Satterley, a knight of Suffolk, England, in 1235, and through his descendant, Sir Roger Satterley, Lord of the Manor of Satterley, in Suffolk, in 1307. The line is completely traced from William Satterley, Vicar of St. Ide, near Exeter, England. (ref)

After this text is more genealogical information.

English Place-Names

This same text is found in the paper Place-Names Illustrating Social and Legal Customs.

Words for different types of criminals are not infrequent in minor names. … sǣtere and scēacere “robber” are found respectively in Satterleigh (Devon) and the Lancashire Shackerley and Shakerley, each meaning “robbers' wood”. (ref)

English Surnames and Their Place in the Teutonic Family

I have not met with any surname which could reasonably be supposed to be from Sæter or Sætern, but it seems probably, from the way in which it occurs in the names of places, that it was formerly used as a man's name. We have the names Satterley and Satterthwaite, derived from places. The latter is in the lake district, where we have also Lockthwaite, Lockholm, &c. I think that these names of places are derived from persons, and not from anything connected with the worship of Satter or Loki. Thwaite signifies a piece of ground cleared in a forest, and is most generally combined with a proper name–we may presume that of the settler who cleared the spot for the purpose of agriculture, or for his own habitation. Such names are Ormathwaite, Ullthwaite, Stangerthwaite, Tullithwaite, in which we find the names Orme, Ulf, Stanger, and Tuli. But a still stronger case is that of a place near Windermere, called Satter How, which has been no doubt the grave of a man named Satter, “How” being the old Norse haugr a grave-mound. I take it then that these names of places are not taken directly from the gods Satter and Lok, but from men called after them. (ref)

Etymological Geography

Nearly identical wording appears in Geographical Etymology: A Dictionary of Place-Names Giving Their Derivations.

ley, lea (Anglo-Saxon), lege, a district, in English topography generally applied to an open field or meadow; e.g. … Satterleigh (the field of Saetor, an Anglo-Saxon deity) (ref)

Etymology of Local Names: With a Short Introduction to the Relationship of Languages

While the book does not specify where Saterland is, I assume the author is referring to Saterland in Germany.

Saetor appears in Satter-leigh, Satter-thwaite, and in Satter-land. (ref)

Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland

Some of the text here is found in The Penguin Dictionary of Surnames.

SATURLEY, a surname of England, otherwise Satterlee or Satterl(e)y, from the English place name Satterleigh (Devon), or from Old English sǣtere and lēah - robber's wood or clearing, with the spelling [possibly] influenced by Saturday. (Cottle, Ekwall).

Spiegelhalter traced Satterl(e)y in Devon.

In Newfoundland:

Early instances: Thomas Satterly, fisherman of St. John's, 1846 (DPHW 26B); John Satorly, of Petty Harbour, 1871 (Lovell).

Modern status: At St. John's.

Place name: Saturday Ledge 47-06 52-55, (Saturdays Ledge in Lane's Chart of Part of the Coast of Newfoundland from Point Lance to Cape Spear, 1773) is probably for Satterl(e)y. (ref)

Foundations of England: Or Twelve Centuries of British History

Sætere

Saturday (Sætersdæg) may take its name from a god Sætere, for whose existence further evidence has been sought in the names of towns Satterthwaite in Lancashire, Satterleigh and Sæteresbyrig in Devonshire, and in the old name of the plant crowfoot, satorlâde.⁶ But little has been ascertained concerning Saetere, and it may be that the name of the day was simply borrowed from the Latin “Saturni Dies.” The reckoning of time by weeks of seven days filtered into barbaric nations through contact with Rome; the Romans again having taken it from the Jews. (ref)

Id., 247; Kemble [, The Saxons in England], [page] 372.

Genealogies of Long Island Families

The Long Island family have preserved the old spelling Satterly, while those in New England spell it Satterlee. (ref)

Geographical Etymology: A Dictionary of Place-Names Giving Their Derivations

Nearly identical wording appears in Etymological Geography.

ley, lea (Anglo-Saxon), leg, a district–in English topography generally applied to an open field or meadow; e.g. … Satterleigh (the field of Saetor, an Anglo-Saxon deity) (ref)

History and Antiquities of the County of Suffolk, The: With genealogical and Architectural Notices of its Several Towns and Villages

This book is probably one of the most important analysis of ancient texts about the history of Sotterley and the Soterle line in Suffolk. I believe it's likely the uncited source of many others that came after it based on the writing style that ended up reused.

Sotterley is, undoubtedly, the southern lea or pasture land of Saxon times, so called in relation to some more important locality, probably Beccles, from which it is distance about four miles [6.43 kilometers].

In Domesday Book it is written Soterlega, and was then the estate of Earl Hugh. Mundret held the parish as one manor under his powerful chieftain: it contained a church with seven acres of glebe, and appears to have been a flourishing village, rich in sheep, swine, and poultry. It was one lenca in length, and nine furlongs in breadth. In the reign of Henry III., Philip Bocland, already mentioned under Shaddingfield, obtained a license of free-warren in Sotterley, with liberty to hold a market and a fair.¹ It very soon after became possessed by a family that assumed their surname from it, for in the year 1309 Roger de Soterle held this manor, with those of Stoke, Argh, and Wirral, in the county of Chester, of the King, by the service of finding a horse furnished for the army for forty days, when employed against the Welsh.² Edmund de Soterle, his son, had free-warren in this parish, and held one knight's fee. In the list of towns and their lords made by order of King Edward II., in the ninth year of his reign, the Sheriff of Suffolk returns that Edmund de Soterle was lord of Soterle.³ He paid the King 100s. for relief of his lands here, and in Cheshire,⁴ and was Knight of the Shire for Suffolk in the fourth and sixth years of King Edward III. His arms were gules, a fess between 3 round buckles argent, the tongues pale-wise. In the seventeenth of the same King's reign, Roger de Soterle, his son, granted the manor of Uggeshall to the lady Joan, his mother, for life; provided she claimed no dower in the manors of Sotterley, in Suffolk, and Stody, in Norfolk.⁵ In 1380 it was returned that Edmund de Soterle held, at the day of his death, conjointly with Margaret his wife, the manor of Sotterley, with the advowson of the church; and that Roger was his son and heir.⁶ Margaret Soterle enjoyed this property after the decease of her husband, whom she survived about four years; for in 1384 it was returned that Margaret, widow of Edmund de Soterle, held at the day of her death this manor and advowson, of the King, as of his county of Chester, by the service of one knight's fee.⁷

Roger de Soterle, her son, held these estates by the same tenure, and purchased of Sir Ralph Bigod 11s. 6d. per annum rent, with the rent of 1500 herrings in Gisleham and Sotterley.⁸

In 1434 it was entered in the court books that “Johēs Soterle aravit quandam divisionem inter terr: et ad prejudicium Dn̅i.” In 1459 one branch of this family became extinct in the male line; for in that year John Fisk, of Badingham, and Katharine his wife, daughter and heiress of John Soterle, son and heir of Edward Soterle, held in Sotterley one messauge and thirty acres of land.⁹

This was evidently a junior branch of this ancient stock, not only from the circumstance that John Soterle had trespassed upon the lord's lands, but also from the fact that the manor and advowson remained with the Soterleys till about 1470, when, the representative being an adherent of the Red Rose, they were confiscated by the Duke of York, afterwards Edward IV., and bestowed on Thomas Playfair, or Playters, a partisan of his cause. The estate, however, could not have been bestowed on this gentleman for his valour at the battle of Barnet, as has been supposed,¹⁰ because that decisive engagement was not fought till the 14th of April, 1471; and we find the armorial bearings of Playters still sparkling with their lustrous azure bendlets in a south window of the nave in Sotterley church, beneath which shield is placed the date of [1470].; whence it would appear that Thomas Playters then possessed the manor of the Soterleys, which is confirmed by the fact that he presented to the church in 1469. It is more likely that Edward IV., whose reign commenced on the 4th of March, in the year 1460, bestowed on Playters the patrimony of the adverse party soon after his accession, for services rendered in preceding struggles.

From this period we hear no more of the family Soterle. Driven out from the house of their fathers by domestic conflicts, when every man's hand was raised against his brother, they fell into poverty, and its consequent obscurity, and probably soon after became extinct. In 1477, Thomas Sotterle, Esquire, was interred in the conventual church of the Austin Friars, at Norwich. He was possibly the unfortunate exiled Lancastrian.

¹ Carta, 42 Henry III. p. unica. m. 1.

² Harl. MSS. 708.

³ Collect. Thos. Gybbon, Harl. MSS.

⁴ Harl. MSS., Number 34, folio 69.

⁵ Blomefield.

⁶ Esch. 4 Richard II.

⁷ Id. 8 Richard II.

⁸ Blomefield Volume I.

⁹ Jermyn MSS.

¹⁰ Id. (ref)

Local Nomenclature: A Lecture on the Names of Places, Chiefly in the West of England, Etymologically and Historically Considered.

The names of other Saxon deities were also conferred upon localities. … The Devonshire Satterleigh must perhaps be traced to Seator, from whom the seventh day of the week is also denominated. (ref)

A Master Builder: Being the Life and Letters of Henry Yates Satterlee First Bishop of Washington

That Bishop Satterlee was interested in his genealogy is evidenced by a carefully systematized “Index Rerum,” containing information and sources relative to the family. Their name was originally Soterlega (Domesday Book) and runs through the usual gamut of change in family names until it reaches Satterlee. The meaning of the name appears to be the southern lea, or pasture land, of Saxon times, so called in relation to some more important locality, probably [Beccles] in Suffolk, from which it is distant about four miles [6.43 kilometers]. Eventually, as a reward for service to the king, it became the possession of one Roger, who was distinguished from other Rogers of the country side by having the title of his acres affixed to his name, being known as Roger de Soterle.

The family passed through a century and a half of uneventful life until the day of Thomas Sotterley, whose adherence to the Red Rose of Lancaster won for him the uncomfortable reward of dispossession and exile at the hands of the victorious Yorkists (circa 1470). The manor then fell into the hands of the Playters and the Sotterleys are lost sight of for one hundred and fifty years, when they reappear in Devon as Satterlee. Their identity with the Sotterleys of Suffolk is certain from their armorial bearings – three buckles. William Satterlee was Vicar of St. Ide's in Ide near Exeter. He was a Royalist, and among other indignities suffered at the hands of the Roundheads, was chained in a stable by a dungheap in his glebe. William's son, Benedict, came to America in 1685, and there married Rebecca, daughter of Judge Bemis and widow of John Diamond, all of New London, Conn. From this couple were descended the American Satterlees, whose most conspicuous representative was the first Bishop of Washington. (ref)

Names on the Globe

Though we know little in detail, the Anglo-Saxons for the most part lived in agricultural villages. Except along frontiers, they doubtless lived peaceably. Crime, therefore, would have been notable, and the spot where a striking robbery or murder took place would be remembered. Morpeth, thus, is “murder-path.” …

Like murder, robbery is impressive, and several names, such as Satterleigh, seem to present the word saetere, “robber.” (ref)

New Dictionary of American Family Names

An earlier book by the same author is titled American Surnames. On the same page it uses two different, but similar definitions of Satterleigh in Devon, England.

Satterlee, Satterley (England) One who came from Satterleigh (robber's wood), in Devonshire.

Saturday (England) One who came from Satterleigh (robber's grove), in Devonshire. (ref)

Notes and Queries

In a letter regarding the origin of days of the week I believe the author is referring to the place name Satterleigh, England, not the surname.

Saturday from Sætere, whose name also appears in Satterleigh and Satterthwaite; but as nothing is known concerning this god, the name may well be a corruption of the Latin “Saturn's day” ([Cronus]). (ref)

Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Satterlee

English: see Satterley.

Further information: This name is rare in Britain but is thriving in the USA.

Satterley

Variants: Satterly, Satterlee, Saturley, Satherley

English: locative name from Satterleigh (Devon) or Sotterley (Suffolk). It is claimed that the modern Devon surname (not the place-name) arose by migration from Suffolk.

Early bearers: Edmund de Saterleye, in 1242 in Book of Fees (Suffolk); John de Soterle, 1301 in Patent Rolls (Norfolk); Xpopherus Saterley, 1579, Willmus Satterley, 1600 in IGI (Bovey Tracey, Devon); Andrew Satterley, William Satterly, Satterleigh, 1642 in Protestation Returns (Devon); Leonard Saterleigh, 1656 in IGI (Lustleigh, Devon; George Satherley, 1853 in IGI (South Petherton, Somerset).

References: http://www.satterlee.org/history/manor/briefhistory.htm offers a detailed history of the de Soterley family from Satterley (Suffolk) going to Devon and changing spelling of their name to Satterley; Place-Names of Devon 2, page 349; Watts, Dictionary, page 560.

Satterly

English: see Satterley (ref)

Oxford Names Companion: The Definitive Guide to Surnames, First Names, and Place Names of the British Isles

Satterleigh Devon. Saterlei 1086 (Domesday). 'Woodland clearing of the robbers'. Old English sǣtere + lēah.

Sotterley Suffolk. Soterlega 1086 (Domesday). 'woodland clearing' with an uncertain first element possibly a persons name.

lēah Old English wood, woodland clearing or glade, later pasture, meadow (ref)

Parish Priests and Their People in the Middle Ages in England

Such place-names as Wednesbury, Wedensfield, Satterthwaite, Satterleigh, Baldersby, Balderstone, Bulderton, and those of which Thor or Thur is the first syllable, may possibly indicate places where a temple or an idol or well has existed of Woden, or Saeter, or Baldur, or Thor; as Thrus Kull (Thor's Well) in Craven.*

* Whitaker's “Craven,” page 500. (ref)

Patronymica Britannica: A Dictionary of the Family Names of the United Kingdom

SATTERLEY. A parish in Devonshire. (ref)

The Penguin Dictionary of British Surnames

The book is an update of The Penguin Dictionary of Surnames.

Satterl(e)y/Saturley Place-name Satterleigh in Devon Old English 'robbers' wood/clearing'. Cottle suggests that the spelling of the variant Saturley might be influenced by Saturday. Satterley and Satterly are Devon surnames; Saturley, scarce, belongs to Somerset.

Saturley, see Satterley. (ref)

The Penguin Dictionary of Surnames

Satterlee, Satterl(e)y local name 'robbers' wood/clearing' Old English; place (-leigh) in Devon.

Saturley Form of Satterley, with spelling [possibly] influenced by Saturday. (ref)

The Place-Names of Suffolk

Ley is a common suffix in many counties and represents the Anglo-Saxon lēah, a lea, a meadow; the sense is rather vague. It occurs in Badley, Bentley, Bradley, Brockley, Butley, Cookley, Eleigh, Gazeley, Hadleigh, Haughley, Hemley, Henley, Hollesley, Kirkley, Oakley, Otley, Shelley, Shotley, Sotterley, Trimley, Westley, and Yaxley; twenty-two examples.

Sotterley. Spelt Soterle, H.R.; Testa de Nevill (temp. Henry III and Edward I).; Calendarium Inquisitionum post Mortem sive Escaetarum; edition J. Caley; volume i. (Record Series)., page 249; Soterleghe, Red Book of Exchequer; edition W. D. Selby (Rolls Series).; Soterlega, Domesday Book, page 41. The same old spelling of the prefix occurs in Soterton, Mortem sive Escaetarum; edition J. Caley; volume i. (Record Series)., page 203, which represents Sutterton, Lincs.; so that Sotterley might have become Sutterley. The meaning of the prefix in Sutterton is easily ascertained; since we find the spelling Sutterton in Birch, C.S. ii. 53, but Sutherton in the same, ii. 137. It thus appears that Sotter– has the same sense as the Souther– in Southerton, q.v. The sense is 'lea more to the south'; possibly because it is to the south of the Hundred River, but a mile [1.60 kilometers] away from it.

Portrait and Biographical Album of Ionia and Montcalm Counties, Mich

Orville S. Satterlee is of English descent, and from his long line of genealogy we trace him back to an illustrious family. The Satterlee family came to this country from England about 1670. The first record we have of the name in England, was that of a Suffolk knight living in King Henry's time about 1235. From him is traced the lineal descent to Thomas, the last Lord of Satterlee, who was dispossessed by Edward IV for his adherence to the Lancaster cause. This gentleman died in 1479, and lies buried with his wife Elizabeth, in the churchyard of the Austrian Friar in the city of Warwick, Suffolk, England.

The Satterlees probably originated in Suffolk, England, but had their property confiscated by King Edward IV about the year 1469, and moved down the coast to Devonshire. There is positive evidence that there was a family who spelled their name Satherly, residing in Devonshire in the sixteenth century, and bearing the same coat-of-arms as the Suffolk Satterlees. William Satterlee resided in Exeter, Devonshire, England, about 1650, and was the father of Benedict Satterlee, who emigrated to America. Thus we have some generations back chronicled to William Satterlee, of Exeter, Devonshire, England. (ref)

A Pronouncing Dictionary of English Place-Names: Including Standard Local and Archaic Variants

The book cites BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names from 1971, but the 1990 edition has a different IPA for both places. The IPA used in this book seems to be wrong.

Satterleigh/Devon
sætɑli G. M. Miller, BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names, London 1971.

Sotterley/Suffolk
sɔtɑli G. M. Miller, BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names, London 1971. (ref)

Provinicial England: Essays in Social and Economic History

While the book doesn't give much etymological information the history of Satterleigh is quite interesting and it should help determine the name's true origins among the competing theories. The map is especially interesting as it shows, according to the author, that the various pieces fit together as a larger estate and run along major rivers.

The large ecclesiastical parish of Chittlehampton had two such detached portions in the 1840's (see Map VIII), one far to the south and the other well away to the north. This, together with the jigsaw manner in which the small parishes of Filleigh, Warkleigh and Satterleigh fit into each other and into the parish Chittlehampton, enable us to reconstruct a much larger original estate going back to some point in the Old English period which ante-dates the appearance of a manorial framework.

By the time of Domesday the original estate of Chittlehampton had been divided into four ecclesiastical parishes and no fewer than eight manors. Satterleigh, Warkleigh, and Filleigh were late clearings in the miles of [primeval] woodland – their names imply this origin – and each constituted a single manor in 1086. (ref)

A Restoration of the Ancient Modes of Bestowing Names on the Rivers, Hills, Vallies, Plains, and Settlements of Britain

I must here allow that the Carnabii of old may have [worshiped] many Gods, and doubtless among the rest Saturn. But our old names, as well as our ideas, naturally arose from our perceptions: and from natural situations in the most early times, places seem to have been dominated. …

and Saterleigh, in Devon, which last seems to imply the same as Saternleigh: for er and en, in the composition of old names, appear to be diminutives, and en, eun, and ern the same. (ref)

Satterlee-ley-ly & Allied Families Genealogy: Volume I

Each volume is a collection of genealogy, research, letters, newspaper articles, and a few other things such as reprinted pamphlets.

Reverend R. D. Thompson of Kent, England, sent this letter to Master Sergeant Thomas D. Satterlee who was stationed in Brandon, Suffolk, England, on March 9, 1965.

I am afraid the kindest act would be to tell you to turn away from “Satterly in Suffolk” and turn to Satterleigh in Devon, as the real ancient home of your ancestors. As spelling was very arbitrary in the Middle Ages and those two places have been described with similar names, I made some investigation into the Devonshire families affairs in the period shortly before some went to America. They appeared to be well educated, some of their number going to Oxford University.

If any further research is done, it would be done in the records of Devonshire and you would well be as proud of them as if they were of Suffolk. The basis of this view is sheer common sense because both “Satterley & Satterleigh” are mentioned in Domesday. Only if the Devonshire place-name had received its name as late as the [16th] century, could one suppose that it had been given the name of a notable family that had migrated from Sotterley in Suffolk. There is no evidence of a documentary nature to show that people called Satterlee-ley-ly made the journey from Suffolk to Devon, or that people called Satterlee, who made the journey from Devon to America, originated in Suffolk. Only the glamour of the Hall over-shadowed by the Church with its heraldry and its old brasses make the wish to have belonged there turn into the belief. (ref)

Satterlee-ley-ly & Allied Families Genealogy: Volume II

This section is described as a mix of material from Marion Pease Satterlee's The Family of Satterlee pamphlet and research by the author Goldie Satterlee Moffatt.

The family is undoubtedly of Norwegian extraction, and it is more than probable that their entry into England was with Canute the Great. The name is known still in Norway, and is derived from the common name of Lee, and the Satter, a dairy on the side of the mountain. Records show that the family were land-holders long prior to the year 1400. Their prominence continued down to the exile of Sir Thomas Satterlee in 1468 to Norwich, England. Later the estate passed into the hands of the Playter family who owned it still in 1918. The records are not complete further until we come to Rev. Wm. Satterlee, Vicar of Ide (pronounced EEd), parish in Devonshire in 1650, and whose sons William, Benedict and Nicholas are our ancestors. The record of their progeny is the history of “The Satterlee Family in America”, and is worth of our efforts to perpetuate to coming generations.

This comes from Reverend Elbert Elroi Satterlee cousin of Marion Pease Satterlee.

And the name is Norse. It comes, I am told, from Norwegian “sather”, which is a sheepfold or a dairy, and “lie” (pronounced lee), meaning literally, “sheltered”. A sheltered sheepfold, satherlie, was adopted first as the name of a farmstead where the family lived, and finally as a surname. The origin of surnames after this fashion was a quite common custom in [medieval] times. Hence Satherlie, which being Anglicized, became Satterlee. There is some evidence, as herinafter noted, that the name had a French sojourn as "de Soterle" or a French infiltration enroute. (ref)

Satterlee-ley-ly & Allied Families Genealogy: Volume III

Below are 34 variant ways it has been found, thru research, that our name has been spelled.

SATELE
SATELEE
SATELEY
SATELY
SATERLAYE
SATERLE
SATERLEE
SATERLEI
SATHERLIE
SATURLEE
SATURLEY
SATURLY
SATTERLAYE
SATTERLE
SATTERLEE
SATTERLEI
SATTERLEIGH
SATTERLEY
SATTERLY
SHATTERLEY
SHITTERLEY
SITTELEE
SITTERLEE
SOTERLE
SOTERLEGA-Domesday
SOTERLEGH
SOTERLEI
SOTERLEIGH
SOTERLEY
SOTERLY
SOTTERLE
SOTTERLEE
SOTTERLEY
SOTTERLY

Only the commonest spelling of our name has been researched and use thru-out this book.

Goldie Satterlee Moffatt

SATTERLEE – SATTERLEY – SATTERLY (ref)

Saxons in England: A History of the English Commonwealth till the Period of the Norman Conquest

Many of the other books will generically say Kemble as a reference. His book Saxons in English is what they are referring to.

SÆTERE.–Among the Gods invariably mentioned as having been worshiped by our forefathers is one who answered to the Latin Saturnus, at least in name. From the seventh week-day we may infer that his Anglo-Saxon name was Sætere, perhaps the Placer or Disposer²; for Sæteresdæg seems a more accurate form than Sæternesdæg which we sometimes find. There are both names of places and of plants formed upon the name of this god : as Satterthwaite in Lancashire, Satterleigh in Devonshire and Sæteresbyrig³ in the same county, of which there appears to be no modern representative ; while among plants the Gallicrus, or common crowfoot, is called in Anglo-Saxon Satorláðe. The appearance of Saturnus as an interlocutor in such a dialogue as the Salomon and Saturn⁴ is a further evidence of divinity ; so that, taking all circumstances into account, it is probable that when Gregory of Tours, Geoffry of Monmouth and others, number him among the Teutonic gods, they are not entirely mistaken.

² Grimm seems rather to imagine insidiator. Myth. page 226.

³ Cod. Dipl. Number 813.

⁴ An edition of the [Anglo-Saxon] dialogues on this subject has been put forth by the author for the Ælfric Society. To this reference may be made for full details respecting Saturnus.

Now there has been a tradition, in Germany at least, of a god Chródo, or Hroudo, whose Latin name was Saturn, and whose figure is said to have been that of an old man standing upon a fish, and holding in one hand a bundle of flowers, while the other grasps a wheel. Grimm imagines herein some working of Slavonic traditions¹, and following the Slavonic interpreters connects this Chródo with Kirt or Sitivrat, and again with some Sanskrit legend of a Satjavrata². But the reasoning seems inconclusive, and hardly sufficient to justify even the very cautious mode in which Grimm expresses himself about this Slavo-Germanic godhead³. More than this we cannot say of the Anglo-Saxon Sætere, whose name does not appear in the royal genealogies ; nevertheless we cannot doubt the existence of some deity whom our forefathers recognized under that name.

¹ It is with no disrespect to the unrivalled powers of Scott that I enter my protest here against the false costume of Ivanhoe; a far more serious objection no doubt is the way in which his brilliant contrast, necessary to the success of a romance, has misled the historian. Had Ivanhoe not appeared, we should not have had the many errors which disfigure Thierry's Conquête de l'Angleterre par les Normands. But when Scott makes Ulrica (Ulriea a Saxon female name!) calling upon Zernebock, as a god of her forefathers, he makes her talk absolute nonsense. Some Mecklenburg or Pomeranian Saxons, in the immediate [neighborhood] of Slavonic populations, or mingled with them, may possibly have heard of their god Czerny Bog, (the black god) contrasted with Bjala Bog, (the white god), but assuredly no [Anglo-Saxon] ever heard the name of any such deity; nor does the chaunt of the vindictive lady bear one single trace of Saxon character. In every matter of detail, the romance is only calculated to mislead; and this is to be regretted, inasmuch as the beauty of the whole work renders it a certain vehicle of error;–has rendered it already a snare to one estimable author. M. Thierry has related the effect produced upon his mind by Ivanhoe. See his Dix Ans d'Etudes Historiques: Preface.

² Deut. Myth. page 227.

³ See Salomon and Saturn, page 129. (ref)

Scottish Review

Loki, one of whose aliases, according to Grimm, was Saetere, is probably hidden in Satterleigh and Satterthwaite. (ref)

Side-Lights on Maryland History with Sketches of Early Maryland Families

George Plater inherited Sotterley, which has been one of the notable estates of Maryland since the days of its original owner. Deriving its name from the English home of the Platers, who there acquired the manor of Sotterley from the ancient Soterle family, it seems particularly appropriate that a lineal descendant of the same, Mr. Herbert L. Satterlee of New York, should have been the one to restore to its original beauty and elegance, this namesake of the Sotterley Manor in England. (ref)

Social England: A Record of the Progress of the People in Religion, Laws, Learning, Arts, Industry, Commerce, Science, Literature and Manners, From the Earliest Times to the Present Day

Saturday is said to have received its name from Sæter, whose name also appears in Satterleigh and Satterthwaite; but nothing is known concerning this god, and the name may well be a corruption of the Latin “Saturn's day.” (ref)

Surname Book and Racial History

Satterleigh–location, Devon. (ref)

Surnames are the Fossils of Speech

SATTERLEE (England) Nat. of Satterleigh, a place in Devon. Derived from Old English saeterd-leah, meaning “woods of the robbers”. (ref)

Surnames of the United Kingdom

SATTERLEE
SATTERLEIGH
SATTERLEY
SATTERLY
SATURLEY

(England) Belonging to Satterleigh (Devon) = Sæter's Lea [Old English leáh, a lea: the person name Sæter is 1 that seen in 'Saturday,' Anglo-Saxon. Sæterdæg (Latin Saturni dies); 2 the Old English sǽtere, a waylayer, spy] (ref)

Treatise on the Local Nomenclature of the Anglo-Saxons, as Exhibited in the "Codex Diplomaticus Aevi Saxonici,"

This book copies this line from The Saxons in England: A History of the English Commonwealth till the Period of the Normal Conquest.

Sætere, in Satterthwaite, Lancashire, Satterleigh, in Devonshire, and Sæteresbyrig in the same county. (ref)

Valleys of Tirol, The: Their Traditions and Customs and How to Visit Them

Karl Blind, in a recent paper on 'German Mythology,'¹ (In the Contemporary Review for March 1874) draws attention to some interesting considerations why the Germanic traditions, which we chiefly meet with in Tirol, should have a fascination for us in this country, in the points of contact they present with our language and customs. Not content with reckoning that 'in the words of the Rev. Isaac Taylor we have obtruded on our notice the names of the deities who were worshiped by the Germanic races' on every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of our lives, as we all know, he would even find the origin of 'Saturday' in the name of 'a god “Sætere” hidden, (a malicious deity whose name is but an alias for Loki,) …

Few people now-a-days, when pronouncing the simple word “Saturday,” think or know of this weird and panthetic myth.² … When we go to Athens we easily think of the Greek goddess Athene, when we go to Rome we are reminded of Romulus its mythic founder. … Sætere is probably hidden in Satterleigh and Satterthwaite;

¹ In the Contemporary Review for March 1874.

² Mr. Cox had pointed it out before him, however, and more fully, Mythology of the Aryan Nations, ii. 200. (ref)

Wanderings in Anglo-Saxon Britain

There are many places throughout the country which derive their names from pagan deities whose shrines must have been situated there, or whose property the land had become. …

The god Saeter, too, comes down to us in Satterleigh in Devon and Satterthwaite in Lancashire. (ref)

Words and Places: Or Etymological Illustrations of History Ethnology and Geography

Words and Places was first published in 1863.

Day after day, as the weeks run round, we have obtruded upon our notice the names of the deities who were worshiped by our pagan forefathers. This heathenism is indeed so deeply ingrained into our speech, that we are accustomed daily, without a thought, to pronounce the once sacred names of Tiw, Woden, Thunor, Frae, and Sætere. These names are so familiar to us, that we are apt to forget how little is really known of the mythology of those heathen times. We have, it is true, Beowulf and the Traveller's Song, the verse Edda, and other parallel Norse and Teutonic legends, but the Anglo-Saxon literature dates only from the Christian period, and proceeds mostly from the pens of Churchmen, who naturally preferred to recount thaumaturgic histories of Christian saints, and willingly allowed the pagan legends to die away out of the memories of men. So small, in fact, are the materials at our disposal for an account of the Anglo-Saxon Pantheon, that the very name of Sætere is conjectural–it is not found in any literary document till long after the extinction of the Anglo-Saxon paganism–and it would almost appear as if the name, the attributes, and the culte of this deity had been constructed in comparatively recent times, in order to illustrate the assumed etymology of the word Saturday.¹ Our knowledge of Anglo-Saxon mythology being thus scanty, it will bear to be supplemented by the information which may be derived from local names.

We may arrive at some vague estimate of the relative mythological importance of the various Anglo-Saxon deities by means of a comparison of the number of places which severally bear their names, and which were probably dedicated to their worship. Judging by this standard, we conclude that Tiw, Frea, and Sætere, had but a small hold on religious affections of the people; for Tewesley in Surrey, Great Tew and Tew Dunse in Oxfordshire, Tewin in Hertfordshire, Dewerstone in Devon, Frathorpe and Fridaythorpe in Yorkshire, Fraisthorpe in Holderness, Freasley² in Warwickshire, three Fridaystreets in Surrey and one in Suffolk, Satterleigh in Devon, and Satterthwaite in Lancashire, seem to be the only places which bear their names.

¹ That the worship of Sætere was very local, appears also from the fact that Saturday, as a name for the last day of the week, is found only in the Frisian, Anglo-Saxon, and other Low-German languages. Laugardagr, the Norse equivalent for Saturday, the Swedish Lördag, and the Danish and Norwegian Löversdag, meaning the washing-day, or laving-day; if, indeed, they do not refer to the Scandinavian deity Loki.

² Fraisthorpe and Freasley are more probably Frisian settlements. (ref)

Booklets

Descent of de Soterle

Satterlee-ley-ly & Allied Families Genealogy reprinted the entire text of this pamphlet.

Methods of spelling our name: De Soterle–Satterlei–Saterlaye–Satterleigh–Satterly–Satterley–Sately–Saterle–Saturley–Saturly, Etc., (ref)

Notes on Local Etymologies: Abstract of a Paper

Again there is the name of Wembury, which Mr. Taylor regards as connected with the ancient mythology, referring it to Woden, as he does Satterleigh to the god Sætere.

It is singular that in both these names we should indeed have evidence of the Scandinavian, but in quite a different direction. While we have so good a Norse etymology as seter, “a dwelling, or seat,” for Satterleigh there is no need to go further afield; (ref)

Magazine articles

Freia-Holda, the Teutonic Goddess of Love.

In Saturday, the derivation of which was formerly traced to Saturnus, a god Saetere is probably hidden–that name being, to all appearance, an alias for Loki, or Lokko, the evil doing god …

… they are all to be met with, not only in Germany, Scandinavia, and other Continental lands, but on English soil, too, where Tewesley, Tewin, Dewerstone; Wanborough, Wednesbury, Woodnesborough, Wansdike, Woden Hill; Thundersfield, Thurscross, and Thurso; Frathorpe, Fraisthorpe, and Freasley; Satterleigh and Satterthwaite, in all probability bear witness to a decayed cultus. (ref)

Words and Places

The article reviews the book Words and Places: Or Etymological Illustrations of History Ethnology and Geography.

In addition to our having historical personages, battles and political institutions perpetuated in local names, we find further that the places where we dwell, as well as the days of the week, serve to remind us of the deities of whom our [Celtic] ancestors paid worship. The name of the [Celtic] deity … Saetere is recognized in the names Satterleigh in Devonshire, and Satterthwaite in Lancashire. (ref)

Newspaper articles

The Morgans at the Plymouth Rock of the South

The article is about the Sotterley House known today as the Sotterley Plantation in St. Mary's County, Maryland.

The family record shows no Maryland Satterlees. Still there is the conviction that Sotterley is a corruption of the original family name. With this opinion Mr. [Herbert L.] Satterlee has searched industriously in his attempts to establish a connection. He has even delved into the records of the family in England in his investigations. These records seemed to show that neither the name he bears nor that of the Maryland mansion is in accordance with the original spelling of the name.

For any members of the family of especial note it is necessary to go back to the fourteenth century, where is found Sir Roger de Satterley, the name being so spelled. He built the Manor of Satterley in Suffolk in 1307. An old church was erected near it. The church still stands and is well preserved. It came to pass that this family of Satterley displeased King Edward IV, and that their estates were confiscated and delivered over to a Yorkish adherent more to the King's liking. This is supposed to have broken up the family, and one branch of it is believed to have come with the early settlers to Maryland a few generations later. At any rate, the belief that these were his people is so strong with Herbert L. Satterlee that he has bought the old [Sotterley] estate and is going to restore it and preserve it for his children's children. So may the house of Morgan be builded upon the lost house of Satterlee. (ref)

Papers

The Development of Old English ēag, ēah in Middle English

SUFFOLK

e -forms (unstressed).

Feudal Aids V (1302–47).

Old English lēah: … (de) Soterle². de Sotirle². (ref)

Early Church in the Landscape: The Evidence from North Devon

The wooded area is sprinkled with names like Stockleigh, Chawleigh, Satterleigh, Winkleigh, Iddlesleigh, all of which involve the English element leah, 'clearing' (The Place names of Devon (Gover et al.), II, [page] 373). It would seem that all of these were obviously surrounded by woodland at the time when they acquired their English names. It would probably be a mistake to regard all these as new English settlements, dating after, say, 680. Lustleigh, south of the roadline, has a leigh name, but it also has an inscribed stone dating about 600 associated with its churchyard, so presumably here a pre-English settlement had a British name now lost ([Pearce, S. M. and Swanton, M. 1982. Lustleigh, South Devon: its Inscribed Stone, its Churchyard and its Parish, in Pearce 1982a, 139-143]). The same may be true of other similarly named settlements. (ref)

The Place-Name Satterleigh

The Place-Name Satterleigh is one of the most important and one of the few research based materials on the origins of Satterleigh, England. The author noticed the same problems I did while reading through various books on the topic. Many of the authors copied each other and when I reached the original source material it was based on little more than guessing.

The author suggests another possibility of the first half of the word Satter being related to plant names. There is quite a bit of an argument for that guess while at the same time evidence to suggest the other theories such as a given name or it being the word robber are less likely. Again I came to the same realization as the paper which is the true origin may never be known. (ref)

Place-Names Illustrating Social and Legal Customs

This same text is found in the book English Place-Names.

Words used for different types of criminals are not infrequent in minor names. …; saitere and sceacere “robber” are found respectively in Satterleigh (Devon) and Lancashire Shackerley and Shakerley, each meaning “robbers' wood”. (ref)

Reports

Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature, and Art.

Some of the same information here can be found in Notes on Local Etymologies: Abstract of a Paper.

Nor is there any ground for Mr. Taylor's identification of Sætere in Satterleigh, …

In the next group we may place names indicative of the condition of the localities at the time the names originated.

The most numerous and important class of this section includes the names in which leah, leigh, ley appears, originally “an open place in a wood.” This subsequently came to mean little more than a field. We may identify it with the pasture of Domesday, and may fairly assume that where we find it large clearings formerly existed. Here we have Bickleigh (2), Bondleigh, Buckfastleigh, Budleigh (East and Salternton), Butterleigh, Cadeleigh, Calverleigh, Chawleigh, Chumleigh, Chudleigh, Clovelly, Cotleigh, Doddiscombsleigh, Filleigh, Gidley, Goodleigh, Hatherleigh, Hittisleigh, Iddesleigh, Inwardleigh, Kennerleigh, Lustleigh, Mariansleigh, Monkleigh, Morleigh, Northleigh, Satterleigh, Southleigh, Stockleigh (English and Pomeroy), Stoodleigh, Throwleigh, Warkleigh, Westleigh, Winkleigh, Woodleigh.

Mr. Taylor refers to Satterleigh to the god Sætere, and Wembury to Woden. It is singular that in both these names we should indeed have evidence of the Scandinavian, but in quite a different direction. While we have so good a Norse etymology as seter, “a dwelling, or seat,” for the former, there is no need to go further afield; … (ref)

Glossary

The definitions are from Dict.org. (ref)

advowson
The right of presenting to a vacant benefice or living in the church. Originally, the relation of a patron (advocatus) or protector of a benefice, and thus privileged to nominate or present to it.
barton
The demesne land of a manor; a farm distinct from the mansion.
benifice
An ecclesiastical living and church preferment, as in the Church of England; a church endowed with a revenue for the maintenance of divine service.
brass
A brass plate engraved with a figure or device. Specifically, one used as a memorial to the dead, and generally having the portrait, coat of arms, etc.
carucate
A plowland; as much land as one team can plow in a year and a day; – by some said to be about 100 acres.
demesne
A lord's chief manor place, with that part of the lands belonging thereto which has not been granted out in tenancy; a house, and the land adjoining, kept for the proprietor's own use.
Devonshire
Former name of Devon county in England.
fifteenth
A species of tax upon personal property formerly laid on towns, boroughs, etc., in England, being one fifteenth part of what the personal property in each town, etc., had been valued at.
inspeximus
The first word of ancient charters in England, confirming a grant made by a former king; hence, a royal grant.
liniment
A liquid or semiliquid preparation of a consistence thinner than an ointment, applied to the skin by friction, especially one used as a sedative or a stimulant.
mainprise
A writ directed to the sheriff, commanding him to take sureties, called mainpernors, for the prisoner's appearance, and to let him go at large.
morrow
tomorrow
plowland
Land that is plowed, or suitable for tillage; the quantity of land allotted for the work of one plow.
Saetere
Anglo-Saxon god. Also known as Sater and Chrodo.
Satterleigh
Part of the combined parish Satterleigh and Warkleigh in Devon, England.
temporality
That which pertains to temporal welfare; material interests; especially, the revenue of an ecclesiastic proceeding from lands, tenements, or lay fees, tithes, and the like; – chiefly used in the plural.
tenth
The tenth part of the annual profit of every living in the kingdom, formerly paid to the pope, but afterward transferred to the crown.
vicar
The incumbent of an appropriated benefice.
villeinage
The state of a villain, or serf; base servitude; tenure on condition of doing the meanest services for the lord. In this sense written also villenage, and villeinage.
villain
One who holds lands by a base, or servile, tenure, or in villenage; a feudal tenant of the lowest class, a bondman or servant. In this sense written also villan, and villein.
Wodin
A deity corresponding to Odin, the supreme deity of the Scandinavians. Wednesday is named for him. See Odin.
writ
An original writ is a mandatory letter issuing out of the court of chancery under the great seal and in a king's name, directed to the sheriff of the county where the injury is alleged to have been committed, containing a summary statement of the cause of complaint, and requiring him in most cases, to command the defendant to satisfy the claim; and, on his failure to comply, then to summon him to appear in one of the superior courts of common law, there to account for his non-compliance. In some cases, however, it omits the former alternative, and requires the sheriff simply to enforce the appearance.

Appendix

Related to Satterleigh

These are all the places others have mentioned possibly being related to Satterleigh and Sotterley in England. I don't know if there are any connections, but it may be of interest to someone.

Bibliography

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Smith, Eldson C. American Surnames. 1st edition. Chilton Book Company. 1969. https://archive.org/details/americansurnames00smit

Earle, John. Anglo-Saxon Literature. Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. 1884. https://archive.org/details/anglosaxonliter00earlgoog

BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names. Pointon, G. E. (editor and transcriber). 2nd edition. Oxford University Press. 1990.

Biographical and Historical Sketches of the Sheafe Wentworth Fischer Bache Satterthwaite and Rutgers Families of America. 1923. https://archive.org/details/biographicalhist00satt

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The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names. Watts, Victor (editor) and Insley, John (assistant editor) and Gelling, Margaret (advisory editor). 1st paperback edition. Cambridge University Press. 2010. https://archive.org/details/cambridgediction0000unse_y6u4

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names. 3rd edition. Oxford University Press. 1947. https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.184064

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